Speaking

Where the wild things are - Benchmarking and Micro-Optimisations:

Performance is a Feature:

I've also been on the Hanselminutes podcast talking about "Performance as a Feature!"

Skills Matter - London .NET User Group - Where the wild things are - Benchmarking and Micro-Optimisations

Skills Matter - LDNUG - 2017 Click above for the video and the slides are also available


PostSharp Webinar - Performance is a Feature! (including Q&A)

PostSharp Webinar

Click the image above to go to the recording


DeveloperDeveloperDeveloper 11 in Reading - Performance is a Feature!

DDD 11 in Reading Image courtesy of Kevin O’Shaughnessy (@ZombieCodeKill), who also did an great write-up of the day including some very thorough notes of my talk and had this to say:

Performance is a fascinating topic in my opinion, and this was my favorite talk of them all.

I’m happy with that!

The slides are also available


ProgSCon London 2016 - Performance and how to measure it

ProgSCon London 2016 A recording on the talk and the slides are now available


Skills Matter - London .NET UG - Performance is a Feature!

Skills Matter - 2016 Click above for the video and the slides are also available


Developer South Coast - Performance is a Feature!

Developer South Coast - Tweet The slides are now available Part 1 and Part 2.


NDC London 2014 - Performance is a Feature!

Click below to see the video of my talk at NDC London 2014:


DDD East Anglia 2014 - Performance is a Feature!

image from talk

Starting with the premise that “Performance is a Feature”, this session will look at how to measure, what to measure and how get the best performance from your .NET code. We will look at real-world examples from the Roslyn code-base and StackOverflow.

Thanks to @craigtptech for the image and also for his excellent write up, I’ve included a few quotes below:

Matt starts by asking Why does performance matter? What do we need to know? and When do we need to optimize performance?
Matt does suggest that we need to be careful and land somewhere in the middle of the spectrum between "optimizing everything all the time" (which can back us into a corner) versus "don't optimize anything" (the extreme end of the "performance optimization is the root of all evil" approach).

One of my slides was tweeted by an attendee and at last count had over 500 re-tweets, it seems like a lot of people really like statistics and in particular Hans Rosling!!

Hans-Rolsing - Tweet